• Area Covid-19
    .
  • deplazio
    The Department of Epidemiology of the Lazio Regional Health Service (DEP)
    is based in Rome and has over 30 years of experience
  • ambientale-valutativo

    The staff of the DEP has specific expertise in epidemiological methods
  • rischi ambientali
    Provide decision makers with the best epidemiological evidence
    to plan interventions to reduce health risks
  • esiti
    Outcome evaluation of health care
  • cure sanitarie
    Provide evidence to improve the quality
    and effectiveness of health care
  • inquinamento
    Assess the risks associated with
    short and long term exposure to air pollutants
  • cambiamenti climatici
    Assessing the health impact of climate change and extreme events

Registro Regionale Dialisi e Trapianti Lazio (RRDTL)

Lung cancers: confirmation of the direct link with the pollution PDF Print E-mail

altIn Europe, during the past five years, the ESCAPE (European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution) study has been conducted, with the aim of analyzing the chronic effects of air pollution on health.

The study, coordinated by the University of Utrecht, has involved three cities in Italy: Rome, Turin and Varese.

The Department of Epidemiology of the Lazio Regional Health Service has coordinated, as part of the project, studies on cardiovascular outcomes, such as the incidence of acute coronary events and cerebrovascular events, and it has conducted, in Rome and Turin, measurement campaigns of pollutants as well as epidemiological analyses on the SIDRIA cohorts.

The first results, published in Lancet Oncology (http://www.thelancet.com/journals/ lanonc/article/PIIS1470-2045 (13) 70279-1/abstract), show that prolonged exposure to air pollution increases the risk of lung cancer, even at levels below the limits set by the European Union, and confirm those already published in the Roman Longitudinal Study (Cesaroni et al. EHP 2013).

The study on the incidence of lung cancer was performed using cohorts of 9 European countries (Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Netherlands, United Kingdom, Austria, Spain, Greece and Italy), on more than 300,000 subjects, and showed that for each increase of 5 μg/m3 of PM2, 5 the risk of lung cancer increases by 18%, and by 22% in every increase of 10 μg/m3 of PM10.

The results confirm those already published in the Roman Longitudinal Study (Cesaroni et al. EHP 2013), which had shown a higher mortality from lung cancer with the increment of chronic exposure to fine particulates and nitrogen dioxide.

 

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